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A few more researchers who were never recognized

April 20, 2014

(This blog post was originally posted on Animpossibleinvention.com)

Impossible-paris_300pxAs those of you who have already read my book ‘An Impossible Invention’ know, it’s written in memory of Martin Fleischmann (1927 – 2012), Sergio Focardi (1932 – 2013) and Sven Kullander (1936 – 2014). All these three persons were important for my work, and they all left us while I was working on the book.

Sadly enough, several other researchers within the field of LENR and cold fusion passed away during the same period, and I would like to commemorate them too in this post (click on their names to get further information about their lives and their careers):

Talbot Chubb (1923 — 2011), Scott Chubb (1953 — 2011), P. K. Iyengar (1931 — 2011), John O’M Bockris (1923 — 2013) and Emilio del Giudice (1940 — 2014).

Again, if LENR/cold fusion turns out to be an important energy source that might bring fundamental change to the world, which you probably know by now that I personally believe, none of these researchers were ever recognized for their important contributions to the knowledge in this field.

If my book can contribute to raising public attention for LENR, and increase the possibilities to build on these researchers work in order to find out as soon as possible if there’s a way to make this technology useful for humanity, I would be more than happy.

So far I have been overwhelmed by the response to the book. Many have given me strong support, for which I’m very grateful, and a few have criticized me, which has given me the opportunity to go through the arguments for bringing this story to public awareness.

Nobel Laureate Brian Josephson made a short review of the book at Nature.com, and you can read his review on the start page of Animpossibleinvention.com.

Frank Acland at E-Cat World made an interview with me, which is published here.

Several persons have written reviews that you can find at the book shop An Impossible Invention — Shop (you’ll find the reviews under each version of the book).

An intense discussion has been going on on my personal blog — “The Biggest Shift Ever”.

And many of you have emailed me directly with wonderful personal support. Thanks!

I’ve also found a few errors which have now been corrected in the e-book version:

The Italian words cappuccino and colazione were misspelled, as was the name of the road Viale Fulvio Testi in Milan, and also the name of the Italian steel mill company Falck (which I at one occasion called Salk). Due to an error in translation from Swedish, I put a binocular in the hands of Galileo Galilei, but of course he used a telescope.

As you know, this story is still unfolding and I’m receiving information that I will share in this blog, and that will also be added to both the ebook and the paperback in upcoming editions.

Stay tuned.

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8 Comments
  1. Stefan Israelsson Tampe permalink

    tty: It is good to be open minded and accept that surprises may be found, that put our knowledge
    on an edge. Brian is such a open minded person. Of cause we should try to optimize our research and focus on things that is close to our knowledge, but in order to break out of a knowledge jail you need people like Brian.

    I can as well speak for the fringe topics as possible but unlikely as well, does it make me crazy, not
    worth listen to? read on for some cool mind-games,

    1. Parapsychology.
    The brain has a dense 3 dimensional set neurons could perhaps be ideal to take up EM radiation that we cannot measure with conventional probes. Maybe there is life in very tiny EM signals coupled with matter that rides on top of our normal EM waves. EM is a remarkable medium and very linear in it’s nature, but it is not unlikly that it brakes at some point with nonlinear terms added
    that normally can be neglected. So this can perhaps create an intelligence. Of cause we don’t know this yet because we have not probed the space with devices comparable with the potential strength of a brain. The only tool we can probe it is through psychology hence parapsychology.

    2. Intelligent design.
    Locally and measurably Darwin is the king, but our observation of this and our measurements cannot rule out an intelligent force that shape the breeding of individuals into new directions very
    much like we do when breed horses, dogs etc, but more subtly through neuron stimulation. Surely
    if there is intelligence that can work as in 1) it will benefit those individuals that can take up it’s signal and therefore make sure to breed in this gene. So Intelligent design can coexists with our
    gene model.

    3. Cold fusion. Really there serious research being done here and to explain especially the results stemming from high impact works with setups that can detect a success rate of 5%, they typically find an effect. Not finding a good explanation on why they do their mistakes means that we ought to continue examine this feature and do it seriously, if we call out the fringy boogy man on this it is our duty to do the test the right way, all else is plain stupidity, the benefit if it’s working is so massive.

    4. homeopathy, again one can be open minded and assume that there is some phenomena on the quantum level that could make a water memory, it’s not unthinkable to imagine some kind of state change to make it possible. But here I must confess that the scientific evidences that something like a water memory is very weak, but it’s ok to try setup ingenuous experiments to investigate if such a phenomena can exist and I argue for doing a little such research, as someone told me when taking my phd: whatever you do, do something, that’s the golden rule to discovery.

  2. @maryyugo

    Spot on

  3. Svein permalink

    Very interesting to read about the story behind the E-Cat. It is a wonder that Andrea Rossi manage to steer away from all this traps, and now hopefully can get a product on the market in a year or two if all goes well. Also your mentioning to Rossi about the work of Ikegami was new to me, and that the introduction of liquid lithium improved the performance of the E-Cat.

  4. maryyugo permalink

    “Nobel Laureate Brian Josephson made a short review of the book at Nature.com, and you can read his review on the start page of Animpossibleinvention.com.”

    I bet you won’t find my reply to Dr. Josephson there! You will find it on the Nature blog here:

    http://www.nature.com/news/seven-days-4-10-april-2014-1.15003

  5. Mats Lewan permalink

    @Fibb
    Good idea with a timeline. I’ll try to fix that!
    When there will be a new edition of the e-book I will write this in the free newsletter from An Impossible Invention.
    I don’t think I can provide automatic updates, but I will provide an opportunity for those who have already bought the e-book to get the new edition for free.

  6. Ah, yes. Brian Josephson, a nobel laureate who advovates intelligent design, parapsychology and homepathy, among other fringe topics.

    How appropriate to include cold fusion into his repertoire of voodoo science.

    http://www.tcm.phy.cam.ac.uk/~bdj10/

  7. Fibb permalink

    I bought an ebook version and I’m really enjoying it. If you change, fix or otherwise update the ebook version can we get a free updated copy somehow? How does it work.? Do you send out a new download link to past purchasers? Thanks for writing it btw. It’s fantastic. Although I do wish you included more date references in the text when discussing the events or developments. I easily lose my place in the timeline. Sometimes I don’t even know what year we are in as things are transpiring…. not a big deal but hey, more dates sprinkled throughout might add some clarity and it would help when going back through certain sections of the book to know when this or that happened without straying far and wide in the text…. Or perhaps a timeline/graphic in an appendix? Cheers

  8. Cimpy permalink

    Tuned. But you played a bit unfair: only positive reviews of your book, that sounds strange (even if perfectly sensed from a commercial point of view). You said you believe LENR “might bring fundamental change to the world” of course “if they turn out to be”. You should be more brave and say clearly if you do believe in LENR or not – and in case, which one, as you still put some hope in DFK in your book, but by now even you should have accepted the fact that Hyperion was a joke.

    By the way,let me remember, I am among those who are waiting to know if Levi answered you about those small oddities Maryyugo, Ascoli65 and Gary Wright pointed out in previous thread. Hope we will know what Levi will have said within next month – are these the infos you’re receiving?

    Hope you had a happy Easter, in any case.

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